FIVE BEDROOM HOUSE FLOOR PLANS : HOUSE FLOOR PLANS


Five Bedroom House Floor Plans : Picture Of Floor.



Five Bedroom House Floor Plans





five bedroom house floor plans






    floor plans
  • (floor plan) scale drawing of a horizontal section through a building at a given level; contrasts with elevation

  • A scale diagram of the arrangement of rooms in one story of a building

  • In architecture and building engineering, a floor plan, or floorplan, is a diagram, usually to scale, showing the relationships between rooms, spaces and other physical features at one level of a structure.

  • (Floor planning) Floorplanning is the act of designing of a floorplan, which is a kind of bird's-eye view of a structure.





    bedroom
  • (Bedrooms (film)) Bedrooms is a 2010 drama film directed and written by Youssef Delara. Starring Julie Benz , Moon Bloodgood, Sarah Clarke, Xander Berkeley, Dee Wallace and Barry Bostwick. It premieres August 20th 2010 at the Los Angeles Latino Film Festival 2010 .

  • a room used primarily for sleeping

  • A bedroom is a private room where people usually sleep for the night or relax during the day.

  • A room for sleeping in

  • Relating to sexual relations

  • Denoting a small town or suburb whose residents travel to work in a nearby city





    house
  • The people living in such a building; a household

  • A family or family lineage, esp. a noble or royal one; a dynasty

  • a dwelling that serves as living quarters for one or more families; "he has a house on Cape Cod"; "she felt she had to get out of the house"

  • A building for human habitation, esp. one that is lived in by a family or small group of people

  • contain or cover; "This box houses the gears"

  • firm: the members of a business organization that owns or operates one or more establishments; "he worked for a brokerage house"











five bedroom house floor plans - Wallmonkeys Peel




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Hubbard House




Hubbard House





Gravesend, Brooklyn

Built around 1830-35 by Nelly Johnson Hubbard, the Hubbard House is, in part, a rare surviving early nineteenth-century Dutch-American farmhouse in Brooklyn. The older section of the house reflects traditional Dutch design in its incorporation of H-bent construction, which gives the house its characteristic one-and-one-half-story form, in its use of a gabled roof with sloping spring eaves at the front and rear, and in its incorporation of clapboard siding. It exemplifies a three-bay-wide side-hall plan type popular for Dutch houses in southern Brooklyn at the beginning of the nineteenth century and originally included an unusual shedroofed kitchen wing, a feature associated with the buildings of Gravesend carpenter-builder Lawrence Ryder, to whom this building is tentatively attributed. A late-example of Dutch- American design, it presents an interesting blend of traditional Dutch forms and structure with nineteenth-century construction innovations including sawn timbers and cut nails, testifying to the strength and persistence of Dutch culture in the rural areas surrounding New York City in the early nineteenth century. It retains an exceptional amount of original fabric including siding and windows. It is one of the few Dutch-American houses in New York City retaining its original orientation on its original site with sufficient surrounding property to give some sense of its original setting. Moreover, it has the further distinction of being the smallest and simplest of the surviving Dutch-American houses in the borough.

It seems probable that the house was initially occupied by Nelly Hubbard and her son Samuel Hubbard, descendants of several early and distinguished Gravesend families. From about 1850 onwards, it was leased to workers and artisans, several of whom were connected with nineteenth-century Gravesend’s thriving building trades. In 1904 it was purchased by garment worker Vincenzo Lucchelli and his wife, Antoinette, immigrants who occupied the house with their five children. In 1924 the Lucchellis constructed the house’s southern two-story hippedroofed wing designed by the Brooklyn firm of Salvati & Le Quornik which incorporated a multi windowed bedroom billed as a “sleeping porch” in response to the tuberculosis that was besetting their family. The house remained in the family’s ownership until the late 1990s, when it was acquired by the present owner, John Antonides. As one of the few surviving Dutch houses in the city, as a rare surviving example of nineteenth-century rural working class housing, and as a symbol of Gravesend’s rich twentieth-century history as a Italian-American working-class neighborhood, the Hubbard House remains a significant reminder of Gravesend’s and New York City’s past.

A late example of Dutch-American design, the Hubbard House, as built, was a small (33- feet-wide, 15-feet-deep), spring-eaved, gable-roofed, one-and-a-half-story, one-room-deep structure consisting of a side hall, parlor, and one-story shed-roofed kitchen wing on the first floor, and small bedrooms in the attic above the main portion of the house. Its interior detailing was modest, with decorative interest focused on a late Federal-style mantle and built-in china cupboard in the parlor. (The interior of the house is not included in this designation.) In their structural analysis of the building conducted in 1998, Powell and McMillen observed that the northern (original) portion of the house rests on a foundation of red sandstone and brick. The vast majority of the floor joists, timbers, posts, studs, and even the curved rafters of the spring eave in this portion of the house were sawn rather than hewn, in keeping with a construction date in the early nineteenth century. The original section is sheathed with wide pine clapboard siding that “has been on the house since its original construction.”47 Its corner boards and window frames are edged with a bead molding with a quirk or groove running alongside the bead “that is of nineteenth century form.”48 At the north corner of the facade, the original entry has been closed and the bay currently contains an early-twentieth-century window. The center and southern windows, currently six-over-ones, retain their original sashes although the muntins were removed and had to be refabricated for the upper sashes based on mortise profiles that although filled remained visible. These muntin profiles, Powell and McMillen suggested, were typical of the 1820 to 1840 period. According to Powell and McMillen, “these windows are well made though the construction detail at the stile and rail juncture suggests that they were made by a local carpenter and not a sash and blind shop.”49 Throughout the original portion of the house 7 machine cut nails typical of period between 1825 and 1880 are used for all “framing work, trim work and lathing except for a portion of the second floor remodeled in 1924.”50 It was the opinion of Powell and McMillen that,











Hubbard House




Hubbard House





Gravesend, Brooklyn, New York City, New York, United States

Built around 1830-35 by Nelly Johnson Hubbard, the Hubbard House is, in part, a rare surviving early nineteenth-century Dutch-American farmhouse in Brooklyn. The older section of the house reflects traditional Dutch design in its incorporation of H-bent construction, which gives the house its characteristic one-and-one-half-story form, in its use of a gabled roof with sloping spring eaves at the front and rear, and in its incorporation of clapboard siding. It exemplifies a three-bay-wide side-hall plan type popular for Dutch houses in southern Brooklyn at the beginning of the nineteenth century and originally included an unusual shedroofed kitchen wing, a feature associated with the buildings of Gravesend carpenter-builder Lawrence Ryder, to whom this building is tentatively attributed. A late-example of Dutch- American design, it presents an interesting blend of traditional Dutch forms and structure with nineteenth-century construction innovations including sawn timbers and cut nails, testifying to the strength and persistence of Dutch culture in the rural areas surrounding New York City in the early nineteenth century. It retains an exceptional amount of original fabric including siding and windows. It is one of the few Dutch-American houses in New York City retaining its original orientation on its original site with sufficient surrounding property to give some sense of its original setting. Moreover, it has the further distinction of being the smallest and simplest of the surviving Dutch-American houses in the borough.

It seems probable that the house was initially occupied by Nelly Hubbard and her son Samuel Hubbard, descendants of several early and distinguished Gravesend families. From about 1850 onwards, it was leased to workers and artisans, several of whom were connected with nineteenth-century Gravesend’s thriving building trades. In 1904 it was purchased by garment worker Vincenzo Lucchelli and his wife, Antoinette, immigrants who occupied the house with their five children. In 1924 the Lucchellis constructed the house’s southern two-story hippedroofed wing designed by the Brooklyn firm of Salvati & Le Quornik which incorporated a multi windowed bedroom billed as a “sleeping porch” in response to the tuberculosis that was besetting their family. The house remained in the family’s ownership until the late 1990s, when it was acquired by the present owner, John Antonides. As one of the few surviving Dutch houses in the city, as a rare surviving example of nineteenth-century rural working class housing, and as a symbol of Gravesend’s rich twentieth-century history as a Italian-American working-class neighborhood, the Hubbard House remains a significant reminder of Gravesend’s and New York City’s past.

A late example of Dutch-American design, the Hubbard House, as built, was a small (33- feet-wide, 15-feet-deep), spring-eaved, gable-roofed, one-and-a-half-story, one-room-deep structure consisting of a side hall, parlor, and one-story shed-roofed kitchen wing on the first floor, and small bedrooms in the attic above the main portion of the house. Its interior detailing was modest, with decorative interest focused on a late Federal-style mantle and built-in china cupboard in the parlor. (The interior of the house is not included in this designation.) In their structural analysis of the building conducted in 1998, Powell and McMillen observed that the northern (original) portion of the house rests on a foundation of red sandstone and brick. The vast majority of the floor joists, timbers, posts, studs, and even the curved rafters of the spring eave in this portion of the house were sawn rather than hewn, in keeping with a construction date in the early nineteenth century. The original section is sheathed with wide pine clapboard siding that “has been on the house since its original construction.”47 Its corner boards and window frames are edged with a bead molding with a quirk or groove running alongside the bead “that is of nineteenth century form.”48 At the north corner of the facade, the original entry has been closed and the bay currently contains an early-twentieth-century window. The center and southern windows, currently six-over-ones, retain their original sashes although the muntins were removed and had to be refabricated for the upper sashes based on mortise profiles that although filled remained visible. These muntin profiles, Powell and McMillen suggested, were typical of the 1820 to 1840 period. According to Powell and McMillen, “these windows are well made though the construction detail at the stile and rail juncture suggests that they were made by a local carpenter and not a sash and blind shop.”49 Throughout the original portion of the house 7 machine cut nails typical of period between 1825 and 1880 are used for all “framing work, trim work and lathing except for a portion of the second floor remodeled in 1924.”50 It was t









five bedroom house floor plans







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